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Christmas Couture- In Register

Originally published on InRegister, September 29th, 2015

Interior designer Colleen Waguespack needed sophisticated Christmas stockings. Ones that would blend seamlessly into the design already at play in her client’s home. After three years of searching with little success, she knew that a niche was missing in the market. A niche that perhaps she could fill.

“I recognized the need for Christmas décor that complemented the décor of the houses I was working on,” says Waguespack, with Holden and Dupuy Interiors. “Pottery Barn stockings are great for the den, but they didn’t look right in the formal living room.”

“Fig & Dove is a couture line of holiday decorations,” says Waguespack. “Every custom piece is one of a kind and handmade by local craftsmen.” Waguespack teamed up with Mollie Hill, an interior designer and co-owner of Red Beans Children’s Clothing, to create a brand that would have national appeal yet be so specialized that local artisans would be involved. They incorporated lines of textiles that they loved—Fortuny and Coleman Taylor—into collections that would offer true options to accompany a well-edited home. Fig & Dove was born.

Indeed, Waguespack and Hill use a local production workroom to create every stocking, tree skirt and pillow—nothing is factory made. Local artist Brad Bourgoyne fashioned a collection of dove ornaments and star tree toppers exclusively for the brand, and even the hooks to hang them on the tree are made by hand. Mia Kaplan, a local painter, sculptor and textile designer, created a collection of painted wooden tabletop sculptures and sculptural wreaths for Fig & Dove as well. And Waguespack and Hill have used local photographers, florists, and website and graphic designers—and even a regional Christmas tree farm—to help launch their brand.

“Every year, we plan to expand the collections so that clients can build upon what they have purchased before. Certainly, it’s an investment. But these pieces aren’t disposable. They are artisanal quality,” says Waguespack. “It just proves that you can start a national company using local resources. We have such talent in south Louisiana.”